The Shadow of the Gallows

Following the tragic events in Manchester this week, where two young female police officers were murdered after a hoax call lured them into an ambush, Conservatives are now speaking of re-introducing the death penalty for the murder of police officers. The former chairman of the Conservative Party, Lord Tebbit, and Nick de Bois, who is a member of the Commons Justice Select Committee, are two prominent Torys who are pushing this suggestion forward.

This matter is not something to be taken lightly; it opens up the risk of the death sentence being wrongly given to innocent people, and the moral issue of whether a life for a life really is acceptable. Surely, most would argue (including myself until wavering recently) that to kill somebody for killing another person makes the justice completely out of balance, therefore making the sentence just as cold-blooded as the crime. After watching the Channel 4 programme, ‘Lifers‘, I really don’t think the death penalty is the right way to handle a homicide. There was one man on the show who really struck a chord with me, who had murdered his wife in the heat of passion, fuelled by jealousy, and repeatedly stated that he didn’t know why he’d done it, and how it felt as though someone else had done it. Even his daughters had forgiven him, as they knew it was so out of their placid, timid father’s nature. In spite of this, pre-meditated murder seems to raise separate debate, and warrant different punishments.

To push for the death penalty as a way of preventing crime is telling of society today. You see documentaries where young men who have already been behind bars casually talk of their time ‘inside’, and it has almost become a status symbol – “yeah, been inside on and off for the last four years” – brilliant. I am a strong believer in the suggestion that drugs have entry level and then those gateway drugs, like weed, lead people to experiment further to harder drugs as their confidence with drugs builds. In my opinion, this is also applicable to crime. I think petty crime leads gradually up to more violent or serious crimes. I’m not the biggest fan of the Lib Dems, especially after their betrayal to us students(!), but I think their ideological belief in rehabilitation is really very important in preventing the build-up to serious crimes. I think petty criminals should be rehabilitated, or relocated to help to stop them offending in the future. I know that this is a very loose solution, and is extremely utopian – ‘where is the money going to come from!?’ I hear you cry! ‘From us innocent tax payers?!’… Well, yes. Yes it is. A worthy cause when you see how terrible the crimes such as those in Manchester are, and if they can be prevented then so be it!

If you’ve managed to wade through my waffle so far, you deserve a medal. Unfortunately, I am going to continue on about my original point. Death penalty – how often would it actually be applied? This is a question I often ponder over. Maybe just the threat would be enough, but so often, rule-breakers are aware of the emptiness of threats. This is even visible at school, when people bunked off, knowing they could talk their way out of losing their free periods. Nowadays, surely talking their way out of the death penalty could easily be done should people pull in their oh-so-sudden extensive knowledge of their human rights. Conveniently, that knowledge obviously wasn’t available to them whilst they murdered another human being with those very same rights. Right…

Anyway – be it the threat is enough to shadow over people, or that some poor soul is used as an example (leading to two deaths conclusively) to scare the living daylights out of these thugs who go around killing, the death penalty simply cannot be used as a blanket punishment to all those who end another’s life. Spouses murdering their long-term abusive partner cannot be roped into the same pool of criminals as those who planned that hoax call, and ended the lives of two of Manchester’s police force with an ambush.

The final largest point of debate that I feel is vital when considering this question, is whether or not the death penalty should be applied for the murder of police officers. Surely this just adds a value to one life over another, purely for their choice of occupation. I am supportive of the police, and will never be one of those types to scrawl “fuk da police” on a tunnel wall. They make me feel safe, and I believe it is a highly respected job to have. However, this then could open up the argument maybe that, if a police officer is protecting the nation, teachers are educating the next generation, so should their occupation be less worthy of taking their murderer’s lives as punishment, should (touch wood) a teacher be murdered? Another issue that requires much thought. 1959 saw the last murderer of the police force sentenced to the death penalty – has society changed too much since then for it to be brought back into force? Red tape enforcers and human rights activists are a real stickler for this kind of thing, so maybe that ship has well and truly sailed.

This is an issue that requires a lot more debate, and I think that Clegg needs to pipe up and put in his two pennies worth to Mr You-Can-Call-Me-Dave, and the Liberal belief in rehabilitation over punishment should seriously be considered; that or isolation for prisoners to prevent the ‘cool’ status that prison gives people – two conflicting solutions, I know. I’m not saying that this idea of rehab is going to work for everyone; I am simply saying that a preventative beats a cure. I know I’d rather have the nation avoid more murders like that in Manchester this week, than lose more lives whilst the Government yet again flounders around installing stupid examination processes into schools.

Let me know what you think.

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3 thoughts on “The Shadow of the Gallows

  1. I like the segment you have added/amended regarding the proposed law only being enforced for the murder of a police officer, I agree that the valuation of a life that is entirely dependent on occupation and service would be a very dangerous road to go down. Great stuff though, keep it up!

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